“ALL students should engage in creative problem-solving activities and hands-on project-based-learning programs. [It] seems like much of this is still limited to the gifted and talented programs, but ALL students — and our community and world — could benefit from gaining these skills.” – Tricia Berry, USA

“ALL students should engage in creative problem-solving activities and hands-on project-based-learning programs. [It] seems like much of this is still limited to the gifted and talented programs, but ALL students — and our community and world — could benefit from gaining these skills.” – Tricia Berry, USA

“People are coming into the workplace with technical skills, but they lack so many of the fundamental human relational skills that are required now because the nature of problems in the workplace are so complex…”  – David Conley, USA

“People are coming into the workplace with technical skills, but they lack so many of the fundamental human relational skills that are required now because the nature of problems in the workplace are so complex…” – David Conley, USA

“It bothers me that we bring math from the real world into the classroom by way of textbooks on paper, where the problems…look lifeless on the page.” – Dan Meyer, USA

“It bothers me that we bring math from the real world into the classroom by way of textbooks on paper, where the problems…look lifeless on the page.” – Dan Meyer, USA

“We always look at the educational outcomes we want, then we back-track to the device, and ask what device and software combination will allow us to do that.” – Peter West, Australia

“We always look at the educational outcomes we want, then we back-track to the device, and ask what device and software combination will allow us to do that.” – Peter West, Australia

“The problem is that school is incredibly boring for students, and as it turns out, it’s pretty boring for teachers as well, because neither group is learning in the traditional school model.”  – Michael Fullan, Canada

“The problem is that school is incredibly boring for students, and as it turns out, it’s pretty boring for teachers as well, because neither group is learning in the traditional school model.” – Michael Fullan, Canada

“Although Japan seems to have a blessed educational environment, there is a gap due to various factors. Education of physically and mentally handicapped children is behind compared to Europe or the U.S.” – Michio Inaba, Japan

“Although Japan seems to have a blessed educational environment, there is a gap due to various factors. Education of physically and mentally handicapped children is behind compared to Europe or the U.S.” – Michio Inaba, Japan

“…Everyone has a story. Everyone has a struggle. And everyone needs help along the way.” – Pearl Arredondo, USA

“…Everyone has a story. Everyone has a struggle. And everyone needs help along the way.” – Pearl Arredondo, USA

“Technology provides us with new tools from which to explore and communicate our ideas, but the heart of education will always be personal relationships – with or without technology.” – Katie Brown, USA

“Technology provides us with new tools from which to explore and communicate our ideas, but the heart of education will always be personal relationships – with or without technology.” – Katie Brown, USA

“I don’t get a huge Christmas bonus, but when I get a handwritten letter from a student explaining to me how I made a difference in their lives, that’s priceless.” – Sean McComb, USA

“I don’t get a huge Christmas bonus, but when I get a handwritten letter from a student explaining to me how I made a difference in their lives, that’s priceless.” – Sean McComb, USA

“As best practices are being developed for connected, mobile, personal learning, we need to have the political will to change our historic systems. Seat time, age cohorts, drill and kill – these all have to go.” – Joel Heinrichs, USA

“As best practices are being developed for connected, mobile, personal learning, we need to have the political will to change our historic systems. Seat time, age cohorts, drill and kill – these all have to go.” – Joel Heinrichs, USA


Interview

“There are not enough tools for teachers. We are trying to give them, in one place, very powerful visual tools that get kids excited.” – Ondrej Homola, Czech Republic


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Video

NYC Department of Education Announces Three New Early College and Career Technical Education High Schools Coming Soon


New York City Department of Education selected Microsoft as an industry partner to support three new Early College and Career Technical Education (CTE) high schools, aimed at delivering a six-year, career-focused program to NYC students.

Interview

“Respecting people’s learning styles puts the student at the center of the learning experience, which is where he or she should be.” – Lauren Aguirre, USA


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Guest Blog

“We want to shape young minds to learn computer science – now when they are at their most creative point in their life. We want students to fuel their curiosity and creativity by developing apps and games relevant to their lives.” – Michael Braun, USA


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Infographics

Exploring Tomorrow’s Education, Today


Focus

Text2teach Celebrates 10th Anniversary with Mainstream Implementation in the Philippines


It is hard to overstate the power of mobile devices when it comes to global education. On World Book Day this year, we shared a UNESCO report that showed that mobile technology may be turning the tide on illiteracy. In that story, we also shared this unbelievable statistic: of the 7 billion people on Earth, 6 billion have access to a working mobile phone This means that hundreds of thousands of people in developing countries are using their mobile phones to read and to learn. 

The ability to learn wherever, whenever, is one of the most important aspects of ensuring that more students throughout the world have access to a quality education. Here at Daily Edventures, we’ve heard from students, teachers and administrators — near and far — who use mobile phones daily to make learning more relevant. One of these many teachers, Ernani Fernandez, shared how thousands of students and teachers in the Philippines have benefitted from a mobile learning initiative called Text2Teach.  

Text2Teach turns 10 years old today, and we at Microsoft are proud to help celebrate by joining the Ayala Foundation, the Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG), the Department of Education (DepEd), Union of Local Authorities of the Philippines (ULAP), and Globe Telecom in signing a commitment to mainstream Text2Teach, implementing it in all 38,000 public schools across the Philippines. Text2Teach is the Philippine name of the global program BridgeIT conceptualized by Nokia, Pearson, the International Youth Foundation, and the United Nations Development Program. The Philippines has the longest-running Bridge IT program among 12 countries in the world. 

The program features a mobile learning package that uses 3G-enabled Microsoft mobile phones to download educational video materials for math (grades 5 and 6), science, English and values education to supplement lessons through visual aid. It comes with a Globe Telecom prepaid SIM and a 32-inch LED Toshiba TV that will play the videos for classroom use.  

Last year, Text2Teach was hailed by Nominet Trust, a UK funder for tech projects, as one of the 100 most inspiring social tech innovations. This year, Text2Teach received a Merit Award for Best Community Program at the 6th Annual Global CSR Summit and Awards in Bali, Indonesia. 

The use of Text2Teach has shown improvement in student performance and National Achievement Test scores in the Philippines. And Text2Teach says that it has fostered positive attitudes towards learning and the use of technology for teaching. According to their website, “The program’s impact can be seen in disadvantaged schools, thus helping bridge the social gap. To date, Text2Teach has served over 300, 000 students from 1,103 schools nationwide, covering a total of 62 cities and municipalities.” 

If you are interested in becoming part of Text2Teach, it is open to groups and organizations who wish to become a partner in mainstreaming the program.  For more information on Text2Teach visit http://www.text2teach.org.ph/ or email info@ayalafoundation.org 

Congratulations on 10 years, Text2Teach! 

-Anthony

Interview

Educating Tomorrow’s Entrepreneurs: Interview with Daymond John


Daymond John is familiar to many from the popular TV show, “Shark Tank,” in which he and other successful business leaders fund extraordinary ideas from ordinary people. But John is also the founder and CEO of FUBU, a successful clothing line he envisioned as a young man in 1980s Hollis, Queens – one of the epicenters of hip-hop music and culture. And he’s a tireless advocate for entrepreneurship, that special combination of drive, skills and perseverance that can change young people’s lives forever.  

On “Shark Tank,” John once noted that “The only thing more expensive than education is ignorance.” So when I had the opportunity to talk to this legendary entrepreneur recently, I wanted to learn more about what fueled that entrepreneurial drive in him and what lessons he could impart on today’s budding entrepreneurs.  

John started his own business almost by accident. After searching for a hat he’d seen in a music video only to find he couldn’t afford it, he applied the sewing skills his mother had taught him and began selling his hats on the streets. Those first hats became a valuable global brand and made John an entrepreneur for life.

Today, John’s work involves helping both adults and kids to unleash their inner entrepreneurs. In addition to coaching new business owners, John plays an active role in the Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE). NFTE, where I’m proud to serve as a board member, is an organization that provided 50,000 kids with mentors and support to come up with their own creative ideas. This group has inspired countless young people who have gone on to achieve great success, like Johnnie Lovett, who we talked to earlier this year.

Entrepreneurship is a subject we’ve covered frequently here at Daily Edventures, from developers who are inspired to create game-changing education apps (like Mark Zimmerman), to students who start their own businesses even before graduation (like Victoria Parisi). As project-based learning continues to grow in popularity, many educators are finding that creating and running a new business is one of the most powerful projects of all. John was himself inspired by teachers and guidance counselors, and says that educators don’t get enough credit. “I don’t think they understand the influence they have on many kids such as myself,” John told me. “What educators should concentrate on its pulling the best out of each kid.”

Technology, according to John, plays a key role for budding entrepreneurs, but it isn’t the be-all-end-all. ”Technology  has advanced us as entrepreneurs and has given us many more opportunities,” he says, [but] it’s like a car. It gets you from one place to another faster, but the fundamentals of business – discipline, research, homework, goals and having like-minded individuals around you are desperately needed.”

To learn those fundamentals, John encourages budding entrepreneurs to stay in school so that they can apply what they’ve learned to any business endeavour they pursue. “If you add the fundamentals of being a tried-and-true entrepreneur with technology, it’s a new day and age,” he says.  

Enjoy today’s Daily Edventure with Daymond John.

Microsoft in Education. We are partners in learning

Microsoft is working to bring the benefits of technology and technology skills to all. We share the ultimate aim of all stakeholders, to use technology to help improve education and learning, create opportunity, and raise living standards for people around the world. Learn more here

Interview

“We want to create students that are as innovative as Steve Jobs, as determined as Michael Jordan, as brave as Rosa Parks, as creative as Walt Whitman, as efficient as Henry Ford, as passionate as Oprah Winfrey and as kind as Mister Rogers.” – Ryan Devlin, USA


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Focus

International Day of the African Child 2014


On June 16th every year, the African Union and its Partners celebrate the Day of the African Child (DAC), in commemoration of the 1976 protests by school children in Soweto, South Africa. In 1991, the African Union Assembly passed a resolution designating June 16th as a Day for the celebration of the African child. The DAC presents an opportunity for all Stake-holders on children’s rights, including government, non-governmental and international entities, to reflect on issues affecting children in the region.

The Global Business Coalition for Education – a business-led coalition committed to global education – recently sat down with Sanna Eskelinen, Social Investments, Microsoft Mobile Devices. They discussed the successes and challenges in partnership building for education as well as how mobile devices can improve content delivery and data management.  Mobile phones – now almost ubiquitous amongst secondary school pupils – provide new and exciting opportunities to support and develop learning and teaching

Infographics

Special Education Infographic: How Do You Teach a Superhero


Many people believe learning disabilities are a sign of low intelligence; this belief is wildly incorrect. Specific learning disabilities pose unique challenges for afflicted students and are very real, physiological conditions. Special education comes into play when a student’s education is sufficiently altered from that of a normal student. From gifted to other health impaired, most superheroes were nothing if not extraordinary.
Hot to Teach a Superhero
Source:
Special-Education-Degree.net

Interview

“If we can trust and empower schools, then we are more likely to unleash creativity, to expand thinking, to provide meaningful and relevant opportunities and experiences for their communities.” – Adam Nye, USA


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Focus

Core of Education: My Thoughts on Holistic Education Reform


A couple of months ago, I attended the Education Innovation Summit, sponsored by GSV (short for “Global Silicon Valley”) Advisors. The summit featured some amazing speakers – from government leaders to entrepreneurs to some of the innovative educators who are leading transformation in U.S. schools. Even basketball legend Earvin “Magic” Johnson was there, delivering a keynote on the importance of educating underprivileged and underserved youth. 

While at the summit, I spent a few minutes talking to journalist Jack Ford about Microsoft in Education. It’s an interview that I think perfectly encapsulates both Microsoft’s long history of driving education change worldwide and our uniquely holistic approach to reshaping education for the 21st century. (Past Daily Edventures interviewee Dr. Rod Berger posted the interview on his excellent Core of Education blog.)  

In the interview, I talk about the limits of technology, the significant (and primary) role played by teachers in making effective change happen, and the need for all of us – educators, parents and especially students – to expect more. Ford ended the interview by asking if I’m optimistic about the future of education. The short answer: Yes. For the long answer, watch the interview ! Thanks again to Dr. Rod (as he’s called) for sharing my insights.

-Anthony

Interview

“I have seen game-based learning improve grades, scores, attendance and classroom behavior. Even the most risk-averse campuses are looking to replicate these kinds of results, so perhaps my company’s work has removed some of the grueling guesswork by showing – definitively – that game-based learning can work wonders in the classroom – and beyond.” – Rick Brennan, USA


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Interview

“I believe any change in the education system will not come until and unless we prepare teachers for it.” – Bijal Damani, India


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Video

Skype in the Classroom and the Extraordinary Lesson


This video is just one of many examples of the inspiring learning experiences being created everyday around the world through the Skype in the classroom teacher community.  Through a partnership with the team at GOOD, Skype enabled Founder and Chief Shoe Giver at TOMS, Blake Mycoskie, to have an inspiring conversation with a group of students from Lake Stevens High School.

 

Infographics

Investing in Girls’ Education Delivers Results Inforgraphic


Did you know that some countries lose more than $1 billion per year by failing to educate girls to the same level as boys? Or that women’s education has prevented more than 4 million child deaths in the past 40 years? Or that investing in girls education could boost agricultural output in Africa by 25 per cent?

This new infographic reminds us that when we fail to invest in girls’ education, millions of girls and women are locked out of opportunities. But when we SUCCESSFULLY invest in girls’ education life expectancy increases, women earn more, and economies prosper. See how the Global Partnership for Education is delivering real results by investing in girls’ education

Interview

“One thing that students must learn is to use their resources. Many people have the mentality that they can do it on their own but it is important to have other people’s ideas to be incorporated together. The saying that two minds are better than one is very true. Everyone has different strengths.” – Victoria Parisi, USA


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Interview

“I would give every child a pen, because with it they could quickly write their story and tell a better story than anyone else. Maybe this could also be a chance for them to actually write down a story that no one has ever written before.” – Zinzi Nsingwane, South Africa


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Interview

“For me, innovative teaching requires the students to use technology and by themselves, realize the significance of the lesson.” – Ernani S. Fernandez, Philippines


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Interview

“But the overall inertia and immune system of “education” is very strong, and if we were to disappear tomorrow, I’m not sure anything would be different than it would have been 100 years from now.” – Alec Resnick, USA


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