“In my vison, students must understand that we can learn in different spaces, because we are always learning. Out of school we see how technology is in their life, so why do we take it away inside of the school?” – José Carlos Duarte Marques, Portugal

“In my vison, students must understand that we can learn in different spaces, because we are always learning. Out of school we see how technology is in their life, so why do we take it away inside of the school?” – José Carlos Duarte Marques, Portugal

“There are still too many teachers who choose not to use technology in class, either because they do not know how to or because they do not want to change.” – Ann Michaelsen, Norway

“There are still too many teachers who choose not to use technology in class, either because they do not know how to or because they do not want to change.” – Ann Michaelsen, Norway

“The rules of society are supposed to be the same for everyone. It’s like a poker game, but it’s important to recognize that the game is played very differently depending on the number of chips you have been given to enter the game.” – Cheryl Ingram, USA

“The rules of society are supposed to be the same for everyone. It’s like a poker game, but it’s important to recognize that the game is played very differently depending on the number of chips you have been given to enter the game.” – Cheryl Ingram, USA

“I think the future of education will center on three key tenets: learning must be 1) personalized, 2) exploratory, and 3) integrated [with the rest of life].” – Joe Belsterling, USA

“I think the future of education will center on three key tenets: learning must be 1) personalized, 2) exploratory, and 3) integrated [with the rest of life].” – Joe Belsterling, USA

“My greatest hope for the future of education in my country is that we inculcate 21st century skills among our students and transform all classrooms into digital classrooms.” – Nirmala Gupta, India

“My greatest hope for the future of education in my country is that we inculcate 21st century skills among our students and transform all classrooms into digital classrooms.” – Nirmala Gupta, India

“I am excited about sourcing computer science talent from 100 percent of the population…As it becomes culturally more acceptable for different kinds of people to get involved, I think that the progress in computer science will accelerate even faster.” – Adam Cannon, USA

“I am excited about sourcing computer science talent from 100 percent of the population…As it becomes culturally more acceptable for different kinds of people to get involved, I think that the progress in computer science will accelerate even faster.” – Adam Cannon, USA

“One of my jobs as a teacher is to coach my students to learn for their future life. If I do a good job, my students won’t need me anymore.” – Nicole Speck, Switzerland

“One of my jobs as a teacher is to coach my students to learn for their future life. If I do a good job, my students won’t need me anymore.” – Nicole Speck, Switzerland

“Quality teachers and educational supplies should be evenly dispersed throughout the country. Until this is a reality, it is up to the students to go back into the communities with poorer education systems and give them a boost!” – Tiffany Davis, USA

“Quality teachers and educational supplies should be evenly dispersed throughout the country. Until this is a reality, it is up to the students to go back into the communities with poorer education systems and give them a boost!” – Tiffany Davis, USA

“We all learn in a different way, at a different pace, and as a teacher, it is practically impossible to cater to everyone’s learning needs. But I strongly believe that we can make that a reality in the near future. The field of learning analytics is very promising and great things are already happening.” – Robin Smorenberg, The Netherlands

“We all learn in a different way, at a different pace, and as a teacher, it is practically impossible to cater to everyone’s learning needs. But I strongly believe that we can make that a reality in the near future. The field of learning analytics is very promising and great things are already happening.” – Robin Smorenberg, The Netherlands

“Only by trying (and sometimes failing) to be innovative in our practice, do we provide students with the learning experiences and opportunities that we may not have had ourselves. Surely this is what we should be striving for as educators?” – David Walsh, Ireland

“Only by trying (and sometimes failing) to be innovative in our practice, do we provide students with the learning experiences and opportunities that we may not have had ourselves. Surely this is what we should be striving for as educators?” – David Walsh, Ireland


Interview

“At the start of Imagine Cup, we were talking to each other saying, ‘There is no way we’ll get to the finals because there is so much amazing stuff out there.’ Clearly we’ve been proven wrong.” – Team Eyenaemia, Imagine Cup 2014 Winners, Australia


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Guest Blog

“I invite you to apply to be Microsoft Innovative Educator Expert, it starts your own learning adventure, offering opportunities for personal growth, which no doubt will have an impact on your students and your nearest community; without realizing it, you’re also helping to build global education: all ideas matter.” – Àngels Soriano Sanchez, Spain


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Interview

“As an educator, my biggest hope is to nurture and develop today’s children, our future, into sympathetic, respectful and responsible citizens.” – Chloe Farrant, UK


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Infographics

Kids and the Mobile Technology Takeover Infographic


Interview

“The only thing that hasn’t changed [in education] is we still need good teachers – tech alone doesn’t capture hearts and minds.” – Ben Ravilious, UK


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Guest Blog

Make Your Mark in Education with the Microsoft Innovative Educator Expert Program


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Focus

Don’t Miss Out: Enter Your Class in the Global Enterprise Challenge TODAY


The start of a new school year often brings fresh inspiration, and brand new ways to teach important life lessons. This year is no exception. Back in July, we told you about an exciting new way to teach 21st century skills while engaging students in a collaborative, international project: the Global Enterprise Challenge. And with only a week left to register before the September 30 deadline, now is the time to take advantage of this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. 

The brainchild of Broadclyst Community Primary School (a Microsoft Mentor School), the Global Enterprise Challenge gives 10 and 11-year-old students from all over the world a chance to run international companies – producing, marketing and pitching products for a chance to win a trip to Microsoft HQ in Seattle, where they will see a real global enterprise in action. It’s an inspired approach to project-based learning, and a creative way for students to practice the collaboration, critical thinking and communication skills they’ll need for their next steps in life. 

To learn more about how the Global Enterprise Challenge works, check out a blog post from the Microsoft in Education Team. With less than a week to go before registration closes on September 30, it’s time to sign up TODAY. We looking forward to announcing the winners (could it be YOUR class?) in Seattle next year.

Infographics

To Test or Not to Test: Questions on Standardized Testing


Standardized Testing
Source:
TopEducationDegrees.org

Interview

“The technology we are using in classrooms today is built for the classrooms of the 1980s… We owe it to our learners to provide learning in innovative ways, and to make it exciting, fun and interactive.” – Kiran Kodithala, USA


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Interview

“In the new world of self-publishing, no publisher gave me a half-million dollar advance. This is me, rolling up my sleeves, figuring out how to get this done.” – Harry Patz, USA


When it comes to the world of work, the only certainty is change. That’s why we talk so much about 21st century skills, and what today’s employers look for in their employees of tomorrow. Simply put, access to a world of infinite information has changed how we communicate, process information, and think. Innovation, creativity, and independent thinking are increasingly crucial to the global economy, and it’s vital that students – and employees — adapt.

So today I’m very happy to share my discussion with a former colleague and long-time friend, Harry Patz. Harry – a 20-year veteran of the technology and media industry, has just undergone a pretty major career shift by realizing his life-long dream of writing and publishing a book. Harry’s first book, The Naive Guys: A Memoir of Friendship, Love and Tech in the Early 1990s, was just recently published and I was honored to write the forward for my friend.

Harry and I not only worked together after college, but we also attended high school together. It was our early days at Microsoft that inspired Harry to write his book. Today he shares the process he went through to learn to write, self-publish and market his book – all skills that were not necessarily part of Harry’s toolbox. And – you guessed it — Harry had to adapt.

“A number of folks said to me…you’re crazy to self-publish, go pitch it to a publisher,” Harry says. “And I could have done that, but after I did all the work writing it…I wanted to put the power into my own hand. It’s hard to think you can be all things…you need to know what skills you’re good at, and where to outsource help.”

What does Harry think it takes to adeptly change course? “You want to continue to challenge yourself to build new skills,” he says. “I had to learn and embrace some very new experiences and it invigorated me to enter a new creative side of my world. It’s also a bit scary in some ways. You don’t have a security blanket beyond you.”

I want to thank Harry for sharing his story with us here at Daily Edventures. While it’s not our usual subject matter, Harry’s dynamic shift to new skill sets as he changed careers is certainly applicable to today’s students, who will be entering a radically changed workforce. Enjoy!

Harry Patz, Jr. is a twenty-year veteran of the tech and media industries. He has been a participant of the Nantucket Atheneum Writer’s Group since October, 2013. Harry contributed a short story, “Off Season” for the group’s published anthology collection, The Moving Pen: A Nantucket Atheneum Writer’s Group Anthology, published in June, 2014. 

Harry holds an MBA from The Johnson School at Cornell University and a BS in Management from Boston College. He splits his time between Westchester, New York and Nantucket, Massachusetts.

Interview

“Technology, to me, is a mediator that can be the interface between students and their daily lives, their interest in new technologies and the knowledge and culture I wish to transmit to them.” – Gaëtan Guironnet, France


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Interview

“We’ve worked with laptops, mobile phones and tablets and I feel that no matter what the device is, students are always motivated.” – Paula Vorne, Finland


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Interview

“We can begin innovating immediately. One effective approach is to integrate literacy into the content areas of science, social studies and math. Our students’ futures will depend on how literate they are in technological areas.” – Beth Maloney, USA


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Video

Preparing Students at Washington State School for the Blind


The Washington State School for the Blind (WSSB) was founded in 1886 to provide an education for the state’s blind and hearing-impaired students. But it wasn’t until 2010 that the mission truly became a reality. That’s when mathematics teacher Robin Lowell, along with her peers, began using Microsoft Lync and Yammer for distance learning to ensure that visually impaired students, wherever they happened to live, had access to a quality education.

Infographics

Back To School Trends Infograpic


Mobile technology continues to play a huge part in our daily lives, it has become one of the most rapidly evolving and adapted technologies among a variety of industries – from government to education.

As a result, mobile technology has been highly influential on public schools – so much that 83% of K-12 schools plan on allowing mobile or tablet devices in the classroom within the next 5 years. As the influence of mobile tech extends to parents, many believe that it helps to promote curiosity, makes learning fun and teaches kids about different events around the world.

 

Interview

“A word of encouragement is life changing as it can take someone from the bottom to the top in seconds, and for over 20 years I have had the opportunity to uplift, motivate and empower people all over the world.” – Derrick Hayes, USA


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Interview

“Education must be entertaining and dynamic.” – Julio A. Santiago Quirós


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Video

Microsoft Surface and Productivity Tools Empower Distance Learning and Collaboration


Back-to-school time used to mean an abrupt – and sometimes difficult – shift from the freedom and fresh air of summertime to long days in the classroom. For today’s students, learning takes place not only in the classroom, but also at home, outside, in libraries, and any place with an Internet connection. Effective learning technology needs to be as smart, flexible and hardworking as today’s students and teachers.

For one UK school, anywhere, anytime learning plays a critical role in transforming their approach to 21st century learning, resulting in more engaged students and better student outcomes. Watch more on how Broadclyst is using anytime anywhere learning to engage students in and out of the classroom

Interview

“People talk about career and college readiness…I think civic readiness is a third ‘C’ that’s essential and sometimes overlooked.” – Anna E. Baldwin, USA


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Interview

“When it comes to manufacturing, it is critical that schools keep up with changes in technology. As quickly as industry is changing, the education system must respond quickly, too.” – Jeannine Kunz, USA


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