“One of my jobs as a teacher is to coach my students to learn for their future life. If I do a good job, my students won’t need me anymore.” – Nicole Speck, Switzerland

“One of my jobs as a teacher is to coach my students to learn for their future life. If I do a good job, my students won’t need me anymore.” – Nicole Speck, Switzerland

“Quality teachers and educational supplies should be evenly dispersed throughout the country. Until this is a reality, it is up to the students to go back into the communities with poorer education systems and give them a boost!” – Tiffany Davis, USA

“Quality teachers and educational supplies should be evenly dispersed throughout the country. Until this is a reality, it is up to the students to go back into the communities with poorer education systems and give them a boost!” – Tiffany Davis, USA

“We all learn in a different way, at a different pace, and as a teacher, it is practically impossible to cater to everyone’s learning needs. But I strongly believe that we can make that a reality in the near future. The field of learning analytics is very promising and great things are already happening.” – Robin Smorenberg, The Netherlands

“We all learn in a different way, at a different pace, and as a teacher, it is practically impossible to cater to everyone’s learning needs. But I strongly believe that we can make that a reality in the near future. The field of learning analytics is very promising and great things are already happening.” – Robin Smorenberg, The Netherlands

“Only by trying (and sometimes failing) to be innovative in our practice, do we provide students with the learning experiences and opportunities that we may not have had ourselves. Surely this is what we should be striving for as educators?” – David Walsh, Ireland

“Only by trying (and sometimes failing) to be innovative in our practice, do we provide students with the learning experiences and opportunities that we may not have had ourselves. Surely this is what we should be striving for as educators?” – David Walsh, Ireland

Just to Summarize it: it is life changing!

Just to Summarize it: it is life changing!

“Only education gives meaningful freedom and a reason for our existence. Education differentiates between an animal and a human being. Education makes our life beautiful.” – Anutosh Deb, India

“Only education gives meaningful freedom and a reason for our existence. Education differentiates between an animal and a human being. Education makes our life beautiful.” – Anutosh Deb, India

“I think language education can play a critical role in the world, since language leads to better understanding other people: If you know a language, you can better understand the person’s true heart.” – Meejeong Song, USA

“I think language education can play a critical role in the world, since language leads to better understanding other people: If you know a language, you can better understand the person’s true heart.” – Meejeong Song, USA

“My most exciting moments are often related to sharing the tools that I know and love and seeing the wheels turning when a teacher realizes the potential of what I am demonstrating for them.” – David Lopez, USA

“My most exciting moments are often related to sharing the tools that I know and love and seeing the wheels turning when a teacher realizes the potential of what I am demonstrating for them.” – David Lopez, USA

“Teaching is about relationships.  Students need to know you care before they will care about what you know.” – Jason Messer, USA

“Teaching is about relationships. Students need to know you care before they will care about what you know.” – Jason Messer, USA

“Many teachers feel confined by state examinations and the content that needs to be taught for students to be prepared for them. It is easy to be consumed by this pressure and not too risk innovative practices that may be perceived by some to undermine a students progress towards this destination on the map.” – Steve Martin, New Zealand

“Many teachers feel confined by state examinations and the content that needs to be taught for students to be prepared for them. It is easy to be consumed by this pressure and not too risk innovative practices that may be perceived by some to undermine a students progress towards this destination on the map.” – Steve Martin, New Zealand


Infographics

To Test or Not to Test: Questions on Standardized Testing


Standardized Testing
Source:
TopEducationDegrees.org

Interview

“The technology we are using in classrooms today is built for the classrooms of the 1980s… We owe it to our learners to provide learning in innovative ways, and to make it exciting, fun and interactive.” – Kiran Kodithala, USA


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Interview

“In the new world of self-publishing, no publisher gave me a half-million dollar advance. This is me, rolling up my sleeves, figuring out how to get this done.” – Harry Patz, USA


When it comes to the world of work, the only certainty is change. That’s why we talk so much about 21st century skills, and what today’s employers look for in their employees of tomorrow. Simply put, access to a world of infinite information has changed how we communicate, process information, and think. Innovation, creativity, and independent thinking are increasingly crucial to the global economy, and it’s vital that students – and employees — adapt.

So today I’m very happy to share my discussion with a former colleague and long-time friend, Harry Patz. Harry – a 20-year veteran of the technology and media industry, has just undergone a pretty major career shift by realizing his life-long dream of writing and publishing a book. Harry’s first book, The Naive Guys: A Memoir of Friendship, Love and Tech in the Early 1990s, was just recently published and I was honored to write the forward for my friend.

Harry and I not only worked together after college, but we also attended high school together. It was our early days at Microsoft that inspired Harry to write his book. Today he shares the process he went through to learn to write, self-publish and market his book – all skills that were not necessarily part of Harry’s toolbox. And – you guessed it — Harry had to adapt.

“A number of folks said to me…you’re crazy to self-publish, go pitch it to a publisher,” Harry says. “And I could have done that, but after I did all the work writing it…I wanted to put the power into my own hand. It’s hard to think you can be all things…you need to know what skills you’re good at, and where to outsource help.”

What does Harry think it takes to adeptly change course? “You want to continue to challenge yourself to build new skills,” he says. “I had to learn and embrace some very new experiences and it invigorated me to enter a new creative side of my world. It’s also a bit scary in some ways. You don’t have a security blanket beyond you.”

I want to thank Harry for sharing his story with us here at Daily Edventures. While it’s not our usual subject matter, Harry’s dynamic shift to new skill sets as he changed careers is certainly applicable to today’s students, who will be entering a radically changed workforce. Enjoy!

Harry Patz, Jr. is a twenty-year veteran of the tech and media industries. He has been a participant of the Nantucket Atheneum Writer’s Group since October, 2013. Harry contributed a short story, “Off Season” for the group’s published anthology collection, The Moving Pen: A Nantucket Atheneum Writer’s Group Anthology, published in June, 2014. 

Harry holds an MBA from The Johnson School at Cornell University and a BS in Management from Boston College. He splits his time between Westchester, New York and Nantucket, Massachusetts.

Interview

“Technology, to me, is a mediator that can be the interface between students and their daily lives, their interest in new technologies and the knowledge and culture I wish to transmit to them.” – Gaëtan Guironnet, France


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“We’ve worked with laptops, mobile phones and tablets and I feel that no matter what the device is, students are always motivated.” – Paula Vorne, Finland


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Interview

“We can begin innovating immediately. One effective approach is to integrate literacy into the content areas of science, social studies and math. Our students’ futures will depend on how literate they are in technological areas.” – Beth Maloney, USA


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Video

Preparing Students at Washington State School for the Blind


The Washington State School for the Blind (WSSB) was founded in 1886 to provide an education for the state’s blind and hearing-impaired students. But it wasn’t until 2010 that the mission truly became a reality. That’s when mathematics teacher Robin Lowell, along with her peers, began using Microsoft Lync and Yammer for distance learning to ensure that visually impaired students, wherever they happened to live, had access to a quality education.

Infographics

Back To School Trends Infograpic


Mobile technology continues to play a huge part in our daily lives, it has become one of the most rapidly evolving and adapted technologies among a variety of industries – from government to education.

As a result, mobile technology has been highly influential on public schools – so much that 83% of K-12 schools plan on allowing mobile or tablet devices in the classroom within the next 5 years. As the influence of mobile tech extends to parents, many believe that it helps to promote curiosity, makes learning fun and teaches kids about different events around the world.

 

Interview

“A word of encouragement is life changing as it can take someone from the bottom to the top in seconds, and for over 20 years I have had the opportunity to uplift, motivate and empower people all over the world.” – Derrick Hayes, USA


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Interview

“Education must be entertaining and dynamic.” – Julio A. Santiago Quirós


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Video

Microsoft Surface and Productivity Tools Empower Distance Learning and Collaboration


Back-to-school time used to mean an abrupt – and sometimes difficult – shift from the freedom and fresh air of summertime to long days in the classroom. For today’s students, learning takes place not only in the classroom, but also at home, outside, in libraries, and any place with an Internet connection. Effective learning technology needs to be as smart, flexible and hardworking as today’s students and teachers.

For one UK school, anywhere, anytime learning plays a critical role in transforming their approach to 21st century learning, resulting in more engaged students and better student outcomes. Watch more on how Broadclyst is using anytime anywhere learning to engage students in and out of the classroom

Interview

“People talk about career and college readiness…I think civic readiness is a third ‘C’ that’s essential and sometimes overlooked.” – Anna E. Baldwin, USA


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Interview

“When it comes to manufacturing, it is critical that schools keep up with changes in technology. As quickly as industry is changing, the education system must respond quickly, too.” – Jeannine Kunz, USA


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Infographics

4 Ways the Internet is Making Kids Smarter Infographic


A familiar theme that has accompanied the growing number of kids using the internet in relation to educational research, is that it could be harmful to their mental capacity and development.

This infographic puts forward four specific reasons why the internet is far from detrimental to our children and is in fact, helping making kids smarter.

4 Ways the Internet is Making Kids Smarter - Via Who Is Hosting This: The Blog

 

Interview

“I want my students to be the type of people who won’t quit. Instead of them saying ‘I can’t get an A on my history test because I’m bad at history,’ I want them to think ‘How can I get an A on my history test, even though I am bad at history?’ When students think ‘HOW?’ instead of taking the easy way out and giving up, it leads to more critical thinking and persistence.” – Jane Cui, USA


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Interview

“Our goal is to provide local industry with the trained workforce they need.” – Dan Horine, USA


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Video

Bill Gates Sits Down and Talks with Daily Edventure Alumni, Katie Brown


Bill Gates and Daily Edventures alumni Katie Brown, recently sat down and discussed the importance of professional development, leadership, and the culture within schools that enable teachers to succeed. The also covered hot topics like teacher-to-teacher collaboration, standardized tests, and Common Core State Standards.

Interview

“Every student is unique in his or her strengths and challenges, and it is the job of the teacher to foster highly individualized learning in response to the student. Not the other way around.” – Ellen Brandenberger, USA


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Interview

“You can see how many different projects can join together for the same cause.” – Team I Copy You, Qatar


Some of the most exciting projects at the Imagine Cup World Finals competition are the ones that aim to break down barriers and make learning more accessible for all. For Qatar’s I Copy You team, participants in the World Citizenship category, the focus was on children diagnosed with autism – a large and growing community that is often underserved in traditional classrooms.

The team of two recent Qatar University computer science graduates presented a low-cost educational software that uses the Kinect camera to detect a child’s motion. The software then provides feedback to a RoboSapien (a low-cost humanoid robot) that mimics the child’s movement. Because children on the autism spectrum have difficulties with typical human interaction, this friendly robotic learning tool can make an important difference in the learning process.

I Copy You teammates Nour Musa and Wa’ed Hakouz, along with their mentor, took a few minutes to talk to me about their project, and I was impressed with not only their innovation, but the passion behind it. “We’ve tested it in schools, we’ve tested it with teachers, and with children,” Wa’ed told me. And because kids with autism have very different sets of strengths and challenges, they’ve customized the app based on the unique needs of students they were working with. “We worked with a child named Mohammed,” Wa’ed explained. “We talked to his parents, his teachers, his nurse, and we took into account his skills to create customized games.”

The idea came from their college supervisor, who brought a robot into class. According to Nour, “One of the children we worked with wanted to dress up the robot as a princess,” and that immediate connection between child and robot inspired I Copy You.

This was the team’s first Imagine Cup experience (here’s more from their win at the 2014 Pan-Arab competition), and they were clearly thrilled with the opportunity to interact with other teams at the competition, young people who share their love for technology, and their belief that it can make a difference in the world.  As Nour says, “You can see how many different projects can join together for the same cause.” And it’s that potential – a combination of global collaboration and inspired projects like I Copy You – that perfectly illustrates the power of the Imagine Cup. Enjoy today’s Daily Edventure with I Copy You.

-Anthony

Interview

“The speaker asked, ‘Are there any Kiwis in the house?’ and our entire team just blanked out.” -Team Estimeet, New Zealand


If there’s anyone who can tell you what it feels like to have months of hard work pay off and culminate in a single moment of euphoria, it’s Jason Wei and his teammates Hayden Do, Chris Duan, and Derek Zhu from Team Estimeet. This is the story of four amazing students from the University of Auckland who, powered by a brilliant idea, passion for what they do, and a relentless work ethic, won the Innovation category at the 2014 Imagine Cup Finals in Seattle, Washington.

From left, Steve Guggenheimer with Hayden Do, Jason Wei, and Chris Duan of Estimeet

“It took us a moment to process that and it was only when he said ‘Estimeet from New Zealand!’ that we leaped from our seats,” Jason describes. It’s a special feeling, indeed, to not only be judged but recognized by the likes of Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft, and Erik Martin, founder of Reddit, carrying a huge New Zealand flag up proudly to the world stage and shining amongst peers representing the cream of the crop of their respective countries. We had a chance to speak with Jason when the Imagine Cup finalists were presenting their projects at Microsoft’s Redmond campus, and were immediately wowed by the functionality, polish, and usability of the app.

Estimeet is an app that solves a real social dilemma by saving a lot of headaches when meeting up with friends. By allowing you to easily create an event and add your friends, you can see their real-time location and estimated time of arrival so there’s less guessing and waiting (see video for a quick demo from Jason).

“Friends being late and not letting you know is such a big issue that we just accept as part of our daily lives. Being able to step up and come up with an idea that solves this widespread problem (which affects everyone!) and developing the actual app is definitely the most rewarding thing,” says Jason.

The very intuitive nature of the app, however, is perhaps what makes it so innovative and what landed the team the top prize in this category. As Steve Guggenheimer (Chief Evangelist for Microsoft) put it prior to announcing Estimeet as this year’s winners, “with innovation, you don’t always know what you’re looking for, but when you see it, you’ve found it.” And while combining a real world problem with creative thinking and technical prowess may give you a great idea for an app, it’s hard work that’s the real catalyst behind success on such a huge stage.

“We’ve really put everything into Estimeet as a project- six months of constant hard work and refining the app and presentation- to be recognized and rewarded is really satisfying and motivates us further to move ahead as a start-up. Hard work really pays off.” It’s difficult to summarize the blood, sweat, and tears of half a year in a single sentence, but for Team Estimeet, all that hard work took them to the moment they stood up on that Imagine Cup Finals stage on August 1st.

“It’s hard to describe what went through our minds that exact moment but it would’ve been something along the lines of ‘Wow. We just WON at the World Stage!’”